Frieze Highlights 2013

This is Frieze's sophomore fair in New York (originally started in London) and it was met with repeated excitement from the art world. Frieze hosts the top blue chip galleries and artists from around the world in their tent on Randall's Island and is a quick water taxi ride away from Mid-Town Manhattan.

This is Frieze's sophomore fair in New York (originally started in London) and it was met with repeated excitement from the art world. Frieze hosts the top blue chip galleries and artists from around the world in their tent on Randall's Island and is a quick water taxi ride away from Mid-Town Manhattan. I toured Frieze on their opening preview this Thursday and selected a few of my favorite pieces from the fair (hard choice with 180 galleries and from 32 countries!!) I also made sure to wear my new style obsession, a headband from L-atitude designer, Sequence. When you walk the fair you have to be in comfortable shoes and clothing and a headband is a great way to have a bit of funk to an otherwise practical outfit.

 


Untitled (You Look Good) by Barbara Kruger, offered at $250,000, is seen in the background at the L&M Arts Los Angeles booth. Kruger is know for her text based works and a personal fave for obvious reasons. 

 
Me and White Snow Balloon Dog Paul McCarthy's smaller balloon dog, at the Hauser & Wirth booth. The piece came in 40 unique colors, all of which sold out at $25,000 each. McCarthy also created the large red puppy in the Frieze sculpture garden in front of the fair and has two public sculptures on the Westside Highway and Pier 54.  Look out Mr Koons- there's a new dog in town. 

Nick Cave Sound Suit at Jack Shainman Gallery. Cave recently transformed Grand Central with a herd of thirty colorful life-size horses that broke into choreographed movement?or ?crossings?? twice a day, accompanied by live music. He brings whimsy into all of his work and his performances make my day. 
 
Yoshitomo Nara- the work was sold, but Nara has a show currently at Pace Gallery in Chelsea.  

Walton Ford at Paul Kasmin Gallery. Ford creates large watercolors similar to Audubon's natural history paintings, but Ford's work tells a narrative subtext of political commentary on the impact of slavery and other forms of political oppression.

 

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